September 17, 2012 – Photos of the Week: A Photographic Journey and Journal of Iceland #1

So It’s been a month since I blogged and shared photos of the week.

During that time I have been busy! One of the things that kept us busy was we were travelling around Iceland for 16 days. 16 days or 384 hours or 23040 seconds or most importantly, 160GB of pictures! Iceland is an amazingly beautiful country and it is filled with beautiful waterfalls, volcanic landscapes, glaciers, fjords and amazing people!

So naturally I have lots of stories and images to share therefore I am starting a new series which I will blog about one location we visited per week, and share stories about that particular location, as well as travel advice. I am going to share travel advice in my blogs as I found that some of the information I was looking for whilst researching was fairly scant and sometimes dated. It is my hope to give budding travelers to Iceland a bit of insight and updated information about traveling in this beautiful Nordic country.

If my calculations are somewhat correct, I should have a complete photo album for my readers by January 2013, and this series should be complete by then.

To kick off this series, I am going to talk about the waterfall that first inspired us and interested us to travel Iceland, Seljalandsfoss (pronounced Sell-ya-lans-foss). We considered visiting Iceland back in 2009 but since it was a last minute decision, we therefore couldn’t get a very good deal on flights so we filed Iceland under “Places We Want to Someday See.”

My first bit of advice would be to book your holiday to Iceland early. The country is only 103,001 km² (which is roughly 1/6th the size of Alberta, the Canadian Province I live in) and the population is roughly 350,000 people.[Wiki} This means unless you plan to travel in hostels, which are a bit more plentiful than hotels with showers then you must plan ahead and book early. Also there’s the issue of flights, if you want a good deal book early, for example we didn’t travel in 2009 because the flights at the last minute were ~$3000 Canadian. We planned ahead this year and paid ~1/3 of that price.

Anyway back to Seljalandsfoss (pronounced Sell-ya-lans-foss).

This is a beautiful waterfall that graces the cliffs of Southern Iceland. It is roughly 200ft tall and falls over the cliffs that were once the former coastline of Iceland and is considered one of the most famous waterfalls of Iceland [Wiki]. Stunning. Beautiful. Breathtaking. Pristine. Wonderful. Amazing. These are all words that would be appropriate to begin describing the natural beauty of this waterfall. It is quite accessible as it’s just off the ring road, otherwise known as Route 1. Therefore it’s quite handicap friendly.

Seljalandsfoss Panorama

Seljalandsfoss

Often when the sun shines just right off this waterfall’s water, you can get a rainbow in your image. The above image has a small/slight arc in the waterfall.

I often get a sense of serenity and peace whenever I visit waterfalls and mountains. Waterfalls are truly amazing for the body, mind and spirit as I always find myself in a place of zen at these locations, which was the inspiration for the title and theme of the following image:

Reflections By The Falls

When we visited Seljalandsfoss, I was quite glad to have visited it, and I thought this is an exciting beginning to our photographic journey of Iceland…

A final thought:

Seljalandsfoss Panorama #2

To purchase prints follow this link: My Etsy Shop.

If you have questions please feel free to share and comment!

Until next week..

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~ by Larry on September 17, 2012.

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